Monday, 11 December 2017

Consumer Advice


Elizabeth Crampton updated on the latest issues from the Citizens Advice Bureau.


Christmas and the workplace

The Christmas season has a big impact on most businesses and employees in the UK. It will be a time when there is likely to be extra demand for products, services and sales in some businesses whilst others may experience a quiet period or may shut for the Christmas holidays.

Many employees will request time off to spend time with their family, go on holiday or attend religious services. Employees working over the Christmas period may experience different working patterns, a change in the nature of their workload or face difficulties getting to and from work. It's also a period when some industries might need extra support and will take on seasonal workers.
Christmas bank holidays

This year, Christmas Day (25 December 2017) falls on a Monday, boxing day (26 December 2017) falls on a Tuesday, which means these two days will be Bank Holidays. There is no right to have either day away from work or taken as paid time off unless terms of the employment contract allow otherwise. Paid public holidays can be counted as part of statutory annual leave.


Sickness absence during the Christmas season

An organisation's usual sickness policy will apply during this time. This policy should be managed and operated fairly and consistently for all staff. Levels of attendance should be monitored during this period in accordance with the associated policy. Any unauthorised absence or patterns in absence (eg high levels of sickness or late attendance) could result in formal proceedings.

Where an employee is sick or absent from work the day after a work Christmas party, normal sickness policies and procedures would apply.
Christmas parties

Everyone wants to have a good time at a Christmas party, and it should be enjoyed by all who attend and be free from any potentially embarrassing incidents.

Employers should have clear guidance for employees on behaviour at work-related events and set out the possible implications of their actions. Managers may want to remind staff before any Christmas party what the employer's policy states, to avoid behaviours that could be viewed as harassment or misconduct.


more information on this and many more items can be found at the web site https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/

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